Be a Fan.

Well this week has been one for the books in the wonderful world of sports here at the Jersey Shore.

I love watching my daughter cheer and my son play sports. 

I am a fan. A fan of all kids and young adults who play sports it does not matter what school or what town, county or "over the bridge" or "over the tracks". It is inspiring to watch them grow whether it is the same team or kids on the other team. I sit, watch, listen and observe. I am not a screamer. I am a fan. A fan of young athletes playing sports that THEY love. 

This is something that I have been wanting to write about for a very long time. How parents behave at grade school and high school sporting events.

I clearly remember the first time. Biddy basketball. My son was 7. He had the ball, hauling ass to the basket. A dad (who never cared for me for some reason) stood up, screamed at his son "GET HIM NOW" "GET THAT KID"!!! 

"That kid". Hmmmmmm..... I believe he knew his name VERY well. His eyes were bulging out of his head like he wanted to get on the court and take the ball himself. It's BIDDY basketball. Give me a f'in break you nut job. 

Soccer season. First year playing and it was a good one for my son. One comment on parent behavior:

Please do not speak poorly about 13 year old boys. They are children. It is immature, disrespectful and the parent ALWAYS finds out. 

A few weeks ago, I witnessed a few parents who were out of line and out of control at a 8th grade basketball game. The words, the actions and the behavior. Unreal. Another mom and I silently said "It's only 8th grade basketball, no one should behave like that". Two seconds later a head came in between the two of us and she stated "all parents act like this at games". Our reply; "not here".

This afternoon was another great game played by BOTH teams. Athletic, young, talented 8th grade boys coached by amazing, hardworking, giving, coaches. The boys played so hard on both teams. As I mentioned earlier, I enjoy watching how these boys have grown playing sports. They have been playing each other in hoops and baseball since they were little and it is wonderful to see how they have grown into young, talented teenagers. I always feel truly amazed and proud of the opposite team.

I usually sit alone. Today was one of those days. I sat on the bleachers with "fans" from the other team. This is what I heard:

"Jesus Christ Ref", "Oh my God he's holding". I will stop there.

hmmmmm.......We played a catholic school.  Enough said.

This week there was a local basketball game that my daughter was cheering at. Fortunately and unfortunately, I was not there. I wish I was there to watch my daughter, I am so glad I was not there to witness the inappropriate, immature behavior from parents in the stands from the away team. Another catholic school. (and people knock public schools) Don't get me wrong here. I went to catholic school pretty much my entire life.

My soon to be 16 year old daughter was completely in shock from what she witnessed. A grown man, getting thrown out of his sons basketball game??? Adults stomping their feet, yelling at the coaches, refs and KIDS!!! Adults yelling at kids that are not their own at a High School basketball game?? WTF is going on?

Is this how you want your children to behave when they are adults watching their kids play sports?

Remember, kids are a product of their parents. Monkey see. Monkey do.

We all want our children to succeed in school, sports, college and in life. If they are doing well in anything, it makes us feel proud and happy. Let us all behave like adults at sporting events and set a good example for our children; our future.

Of course I did some homework.

Here are The Top Ten Rules of Expected Parental Behavior by Rick Wolff's WFAN Radio Show, The Sports Edge

  1. Parents should be seen, but not heard. Blend in with the woodwork. Don't draw attention to yourself.
  2. If you have something to say, it should only be a positive phrase. It's simple.
  3. NEVER OPENLY CRITICIZE your kid and whatever you do, NEVER CRITICIZE somebody else's kid. 
  4. Please do not do a play by play of the game. Let the coaches coach.
  5. If you can't control your mouth, stand alone. 
  6. Refs are not there to be abused. 
  7. It's okay to applaud a nice play to the other team. We are trying to teach our kids to be good sports (I think) teach them to respect their opponents.
  8. Understand that YOU ARE A ROLE MODEL and they WILL follow your behavior.
  9. Give your kid a smile. Kids do look for parent approval. If you look like you are having a good time; so will they.
  10. If a coach or a ref tells you to calm down, take that seriously.

Let's all set good examples for our children by providing encouragement and support no matter what sport or activity they choose. We were their first teachers an we should remain the best teachers for the rest of their lives.

Be positve

Be calm

Be a FAN

The Golden State Warriors are YOGIS

Thursday night my 12 year old son Patrick and his friends decided to take the Teen Yoga class at SUKHA. They loved it!! They are athletes. Full blown, non-stop, basketball, baseball, lacrosse players and surfers. Although, even if you don't play sports; we are all athletes. These boys are on their way to improving their game both physically and mentally.

Patrick has practiced before many times. With a group and of course, at home with me. Core work, flying into crow and just lying on his back relaxing. 

Have Woody and I noticed a difference? Absolutely. No more pouting, sulking, getting angry or crying! I am not saying it is all from yoga. Good parenting definitely has a big part. Talks, print outs on "how to be coach-able", contracts drawn up on loving the game, being a team player, respecting coaches, umpires and teammates and how to have fun.

Meditations, relaxation and breathing is key!!

YOGA IS NOT JUST FOR GIRLS!! 

I can not stress enough the importance of yoga for athletes. So many professional sports teams are practicing yoga daily. #everydamnday

Here is a great article that was posted on one of my sons favorite basketball teams. The Golden State Warriors!!

Kerr keeps Warriors winning with yoga, creative approach

Updated: JANUARY 20, 2017 — 11:12 AM EST

by JANIE McCAULEY, The Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) - Anderson Varejao lowered his 6-foot-11 frame into a runner's lunge and raised one arm high into the air to add a twist, demonstrating after a recent shootaround the new yoga pose he just learned

Kerr keeps Warriors winning with yoga, creative approach

Then, he took it up a notch and attempted an airplane balancing pose on one leg with his arms spread wide.

The Golden State Warriors have become yogis.

Coach Steve Kerr is committed to changing things up, and he gave Golden State a day off from the practice floor one day last week so the players could practice yoga instead. In the middle of a prolonged stretch at home with a more regular routine, the schedule allowed for some improvising.

"I really liked it," Varejao said. "I'm going to do more."

Doubt you'll see Draymond Green or Klay Thompson doing downward-facing dog again soon - though Green might be talked into another try eventually.

"I'm bad," Green said. "Yoga isn't for everybody. I think it's a great thing, I just don't think my body is made for all of those different positions. I did well at a few of them. It's hard, it's tough. My body really isn't cut out for yoga."

The very next night after the group class, during warmups for a home game with the Pistons, player development coach Bruce Fraser pulled his foot to his opposite inner thigh for an impromptu tree pose. He laughed as an amused Shaun Livingston watched from the baseline.

Andre Iguodala is an experienced yogi who can really cat-cow and is considered top on the team, often taking classes. Center Zaza Pachulia also can forward fold with the best of them. They took prominent positions in the class led by Lisa Goodwin, Golden State's director of corporate communications and also a yoga teacher, at a Berkeley studio - a first for Kerr taking the team away from team headquarters for a yoga session.

No surprise, two-time reigning NBA MVP Stephen Curry can bring it on the mat, too.

"We've had some optional yoga sessions at our facility. This is the first time we took everybody and made it mandatory," Kerr said. "It was good."

The temperature was about 92 degrees for the hour-long power vinyasa class, so it was steamy.

Everybody was drenched in sweat by the end for final resting pose, or savasana.

"My muscles felt good," forward James Michael McAdoo said, rubbing his stomach where his core got a workout. "It was fun. It was hot in there, like working in a sauna. I told our strength and conditioning coach, 'You got to step up your game. Lisa embarrassed us.'"

"It's awful, it's pitiful," Thompson said of his own yoga ability. "It's something I worked on and it's something I actually enjoy. More than just being physically challenging, it's an incredible mental workout. It tests your pain tolerance and your ability to push yourself mentally. That's why I like it. It was really good. I think it helped a lot of us - everybody, even the coaches."

Along with the experienced yoga veterans, there were some first-timers.

A few found it extremely tough.

"I'm not the most flexible," acknowledged player development coach Chris DeMarco.

Assistant coach Mike Brown described his debut as "terrible."

"For me, it was really hard, but it was fun," he said, later adding, "I nearly passed out."

Ron Adams, another assistant who focuses on preparing Golden State's defense, happened to work out in the hottest corner of the room for his first time practicing in that high temperature.

"It's such a cleansing exercise," he said.

The Warriors aren't the only ones doing it.

Detroit coach Stan Van Gundy has scheduled yoga time for the Pistons, saying: "It's got its value, no question about it. Would I consider doing it with them? Probably not."

Kerr goes whenever he can fit it in, typically taking an hour-long class during the lunch hour on game days when the schedule - and his body - allows.

It's a time he can focus on taking some deep breaths, literally, away from the pressure-packed NBA workload and just be just another yoga student for 60 minutes out of his day.

This weekend marks one year since Kerr formally returned to the bench last Jan. 22 against Indiana after a lengthy leave of absence to deal with complications from a pair of back surgeries. Current Lakers coach Luke Walton led the way during a record 24-0 start and went 39-4 before Kerr's comeback on the way to winning Coach of the Year after an NBA record 73-9 finish.

While the 51-year-old Kerr still has some discouraging, physically challenging moments dealing with pain and headaches, he considers himself fortunate to be on the sideline doing what he loves.

"I guess normal is a good way to say it. He seems like his old self," Curry said. "You know he's been through a lot just physically trying to recover from the surgeries he's had. I can't imagine the frustration, how long it took and things he had to do and all the doctors he's met with. His whole story is crazy. We're obviously happy to have him back but not only that, you see him with energy and his presence like he wants. It's been good to see."

Whether Kerr will take his team back to yoga any time soon, time will tell. The Warriors are at the season's midway point and the "dog days" of January as Kerr has put it. Golden State was home for all but a night from Dec. 26 until leaving for Houston on Thursday for Friday's game against the Rockets, with just a quick bus ride to Sacramento as the lone road trip in a 10-game stretch during that span.

Because there was so much time to practice, the yoga day was a nice change of scenery.

 

Published: January 20, 2017 — 11:12 AM EST

Get your boys and girls to YOGA